Using Google+ and Pinterest Search for Long-Term Impact

Good social media advice from Brian Honigman on The Next Web about the long tail of social media posts.

“While there are many benefits to consistently strong content, one less obvious benefit is the continuing compounding success of old posts. Most people think that once a post is a day old it is pretty much dead, and that after a week it might as well never have happened. However, things online last forever and none of these posts actually disappear.”

via Using Google+ and Pinterest Search for Long-Term Impact.

ThinkUp Helps the Social Network User See the Online Self

ThinkUp analyzes your social media profile – not only how many tweets, but behavioral information.  How often you thank people, what posts you tend to retweet – really useful in terms of navigating social networks.

“Every morning the service delivers an email packed with information, and in its weighty thoroughness, it reminds you that what you do on Twitter and Facebook can change your life, and other people’s lives, in important, sometimes unforeseen ways.”

via ThinkUp Helps the Social Network User See the Online Self – NYTimes.com.

10 tiny tech advances that will make 2015 awesome

It’s that “list” time of year, where we see predictions and “best-of” articles everywhere.  This prediction of tech advances from TechRadar is good, and includes

Battery tech (hoping!)

Galileo

Virtual Reality (it’s time!)

HTML5 (I would argue that was last year, but still good choice)

Retina Macbook Air (hoping!)

Smartwatches

Fast Charging Tech …and more.  Link below.

“2015 is going to be even better, what with virtual reality, shiny new satellites, and even a few tweaks to the very fabric of the internet itself. Here’s our list of the tiny tech advances that we think will make 2015 a year to remember…”

via 10 tiny tech advances that will make 2015 awesome | News | TechRadar.

How Google Cracked House Number Identification in Street View

Using a neural network, Google can identify street numbers on houses in France.  Fascinating article in MIT Technology Review this year about how their engineers did it.

“Google Street View has become an essential part of the online mapping experience. It allows users to drop down to street level to see the local area in photographic detail.But it’s also a useful resource for Google as well. The company uses the images to read house numbers and match them to their geolocation. This physically locates the position of each building in its database.That’s particularly useful in places where street numbers are otherwise unavailable or places such as Japan and South Korea where streets are rarely numbered in chronological order but in other ways such as the order in which they were constructed, a system that makes many buildings impossibly hard to find, even for locals.

via Best of 2014: How Google Cracked House Number Identification in Street View | MIT Technology Review.

Most Americans say the internet is actually making them smarter

 

Yes, it makes us smarter –

“It is sometimes difficult to reconcile the internet’s amazing contributions to society (Google search, Wikipedia, email, messaging) versus its dark side (YouTube comments, anonymous message boards, celebrity photo hacks). But overall, it seems the internet is indeed making us smarter.”

via Most Americans say the internet is actually making them smarter – Quartz.

Why isn’t wireless charging a thing yet?

Battery power has always been the holy grail of electronics, and the more we carry the more we notice.  Battery life is always a complaint when we talk about our devices.  There have been no real advances in battery power technology.  The only thing that makes them last longer is size – which is why an iPad can last so long.  When I first heard about wireless charging and its potential, I thought it sounded like a fantastic solution.  Get a pad, place devices on it to charge without plugging in – so easy.  That was years ago, and we haven’t really seen it offered.  There have been some efforts, but they require special cases for devices and the charging pads are small.  Seems there is no standard.  We’ll all continue to wait, and this article seems promising.  Maybe we are almost there.

 

“The technology is there. Whether it’s inductive or magnetic resonance doesn’t matter one bit to most people. What entices consumers is the notion of being able to toss down a phone, tablet and pair of wireless headphones on the bedside table and have them all fully charged by the morning.”

via Why isn’t wireless charging a thing yet? | News | TechRadar.