Meet the Geniuses Who Finally Mastered Virtual Reality

From Wired – The Rift is the brainchild of a 19-year-old tinkerer and VR enthusiast named Palmer Luckey. A collector of old VR headsets, Luckey was all too familiar with the shortcomings every system had faced—small fields of vision, unwieldy form factors, horrific resolution. He was also uniquely suited to do something about it: Years of modding videogame consoles and refurbishing iPhones for fun and profit had given him enough fine-soldering skills to start Frankensteining pieces from his existing headset collection.

via Oculus Primed: Meet the Geniuses Who Finally Mastered Virtual Reality | Game|Life | Wired.com.

Why the wearable explosion is driving tech and fashion convergence

In an age where fashion continually romps through society’s wardrobes and technology governs our everyday lives, we’ve finally reached a crossroads where industry boundaries between apparel brands and digital platforms have started to blur. And consumer wearables—the bridge between these two worlds—are the catalyst for that convergence.

via Why the wearable explosion is driving tech and fashion convergence — Tech News and Analysis.

Back of a Napkin aims to get the specifics of building a startup out of the way

The service asks five simple questions, such as who is involved in the project, what stake each has in the business if it makes money and what happens if it doesn’t. Once you’ve filled in the specifics, it generates a short PDF contract outlining the agreement for everyone in the group to sign and agree to.

via Back of a Napkin aims to get the specifics of building a startup out of the way – The Next Web.

App Memoir Commits Your Digital History to Memory

From MIT Tech Review: The app comes at a time when we’re collecting ever more personal data with every social-network update, location check-in, and photo posting—a mound that will only grow as we make more use of mobile devices and wearable tech like smart watches and Google Glass. Yet most of us aren’t taking advantage of this information, Hoffman argues, so Memoir, which rolled out two months ago, does it for you by wrangling photos from your phone and connected social networks, as well as status updates and location check-ins. It also uses clever tricks to call up these old memories on the basis of where you are, what you’re doing, and who you’re with.

via App Memoir Commits Your Digital History to Memory | MIT Technology Review.

Why Pushing People to Code Will Widen the Gap Between Rich and Poor

Interesting opinion from Wired:  Nearly every part of our lives is influenced by code. It’s the infrastructure that makes our digital technologies operate — the software that’s changing our world in innumerable ways — and knowing how to code opens up a new world of opportunities. Some would even argue it’s a prerequisite in our increasingly algorithmic existence.

via Why Pushing People to Code Will Widen the Gap Between Rich and Poor | Wired Opinion | Wired.com.

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