Teens abandoning Facebook, yet the world survives

“If you are a social marketer still citing Facebook as a hangout for teenagers, it’s time to get a grip on reality. A new analysis shows that millions of teenagers have abandoned that now-venerable social watering hole over the last few years.”

Those of us who’ve been around since AOL knew we would be here one day….

via Teens abandoning Facebook, yet the world survives | VentureBeat | Social | by Barry Levine.

Finding the HBO or the Netflix of the enterprise: What we’ve all been waiting for

“Much like television is experiencing a diversity of new and niche content thanks to the change in distribution wrought by broadband, the enterprise is experiencing a similar explosion of software.”

Software and collaboration in the workplace, and new versions of well legacy software products via SaaS, for organizations.  The network effect in the enterprise, explained by Gigaom.

via Finding the HBO or the Netflix of the enterprise: What we’ve all been waiting for — Tech News and Analysis.

Google and Amazon Hired These Architects to Invent the Future of Work

“Thanks to advances in fields such as neuroscience, psychology, and anthropology and a massive increase in cheap computing power, says NBBJ computational design specialist Andrew Heumann, architects can now do more than just guess how people will move within projects they haven’t yet built. They can trace every possible path of movement, creating complete models of how a building will work (see video above).”

via Google and Amazon Hired These Architects to Invent the Future of Work | Wired Business | Wired.com.

The wrong words: how the FCC lost net neutrality and could kill the internet

From The Verge.

The wrong words.

That was the overwhelming message delivered to the FCC by the DC Circuit yesterday when it ruled to vacate the agency’s net neutrality rules. The FCC had tried to impose so-called “common carrier” regulations on broadband providers without officially classifying them as utilities subject to those types of rules, and the court rejected that sleight of hand. Most observers saw the decision coming months, if not years, ago; Cardozo Law School’s Susan Crawford called the FCC’s position a “house of cards.”

via The wrong words: how the FCC lost net neutrality and could kill the internet | The Verge.

Kindle Vending Machine Shows How Amazon Could Take Over the World

“Instead of running a big booth on the show floor or unloading a bombastic keynote speech, Amazon made its presence known at this week’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas with decidedly more subtlety. It wedged a vending machine in between a Wells Fargo ATM and a scuffed-up door at the Las Vegas airport.”

via Kindle Vending Machine Shows How Amazon Could Take Over the World | Wired Business | Wired.com.

Three things I liked at CES: new tech for your house, your skin and your Moleskine

One of the nice things about CES is that it’s not just about the big, flashy booths from the major consumer electronics brands. There is also plenty of room for smaller startups to show off their goods. And while a lot of these things are either banal (yet another iPhone case) or odd (a connected barbeque?), you inevitably also stumble across neat little gadgets that are worth a second look. Here are three of them:

via Three things I liked at CES: new tech for your house, your skin and your Moleskine — Tech News and Analysis.

‘Ask Me Anything’: How a Weird Internet Thing Became a New Form of Media

Interesting article about “Ask Me Anything” in MIT Tech Review  “Perhaps the most fascinating part of the popularity of the AMA is that it did not really exist before the modern (post-2000) Internet. Most social media forms find their roots in stuff people have long been doing. Word-of-mouth information sharing was the rule long before the industrialization of news production in the 19th and 20th centuries.”

via ‘Ask Me Anything’: How a Weird Internet Thing Became a New Form of Media.

What CES 2014 Is Really About: Your Connected Future

The Internet of Things is the focus of CES this year.  “The future of computing is not just the ability to get push notifications to device you wear on your wrist, answer a phone call or take a picture. It is about gathering and using data to make your life better, easier and more productive. The machines should make life less complicated. Companies like Intel and Qualcomm are leading the charge in innovation by building the platforms, processors and tools that will fundamentally alter how people live their lives.”

via What CES 2014 Is Really About: Your Connected Future – ReadWrite.